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Moore's Creek Bridge February 27th 1776 

Updated: Feb 29

Moore's Creek Bridge February 27th 1776
Moore's Creek Bridge February 27th 1776




American Colonial forces attacked by the British. Moore’s point North Carolina where Fayetteville is today.

Shortly after midnight the Patriots prepared for the assault. Nearly 1000 British attacked the patriots. The patriots responded with an artillery ambush. The British never made it across the creek.



Moore's Creek Bridge February 27th 1776
Moore's Creek Bridge February 27th 1776

On a day of historical significance, the American Colonial forces found themselves under attack by the British. This intense battle took place at Moore's Point, a location in North Carolina that is known as Fayetteville today.



Moore's Creek Bridge February 27th 1776


Currie, NC | Feb 27, 1776 Moores Creek Bridge occurred between Patriot and Loyalist forces in North Carolina on February 27, 1776. Loyalist forces anticipated support from a British army arriving along the coast. The Patriots achieved a victory that solidified their control of North Carolina. Additionally, their victory served as a major deterrent for Loyalist support until the opening of the Southern Campaign four years later.

As the dark cloak of midnight shrouded the landscape, the Patriots, full of resolve and courage, began their preparations for the forthcoming assault. The air was thick with tension, anticipation pulsating through each Patriot, their spirits undeterred by the adversity they were about to face.


Moore's Creek Bridge February 27th 1776
Moore's Creek Bridge February 27th 1776

Without warning, the quiet night was shattered by the thunderous onslaught of nearly a thousand British soldiers. They descended upon the Patriots with a ferocity that echoed their determination to seize control. Each step they took, each order they barked, was a stark reminder of the colossal challenge that the Patriots were up against.


However, the Patriots were not to be underestimated. First they booby trapped the bridge, removing half the planks. Once the attack began, they responded to the British attack with a strategically planned artillery ambush. The air was filled with the deafening roars of cannons and the sharp hisses of bullets slicing through the air. It was a testament to the Patriots' resilience and their unwavering determination to defend their land.


Moore's Creek Bridge February 27th 1776
Moore's Creek Bridge February 27th 1776
At 1 a.m. on the 27th the loyalists set out on their march to the attack, with a party of 75 picked broadswordsmen under Capt. John Campbell in the lead. By now MacDonald had fallen ill, and Donald McLeod was in command. The going was slow, for the route lay through thickets and swampy ground. During the night Caswell abandoned the camp and withdrew across the creek. Once on the other side, Caswell’s men removed the planks and greased the girders.

Despite their overwhelming numbers, the British forces never managed to cross the creek. The Patriots' staunch defense and strategic counterattacks successfully halted their advance, marking a significant victory in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds.


Mt. Rushmore

You’ve heard the saying, “Freedom isn’t free.” And it’s not.


The question is what’s the cost? The answer, 1.3 million. Bought and paid for. Thanks to the 1.3 million veterans that have given their lives protecting freedom. Service men and women, Marines, Sailors, Soldiers and Airmen, the 1.3 million warriors that have died defending this nation.


Many of them are buried in Arlington National Cemetery. A cemetery that covers 624 Acres. Freedom isn’t free and that’s the cost. 1.3 million. 624 acres.


The bigger question is why? Why did they give their lives, what did they give it for? You see, there’s a common bond that’s shared by every veteran, living or not. All branches, it’s the same. The oath of enlistment. A promise to uphold the constitution.


It’s a blank check made out to the American people with a simple promise to defend the freedoms defined in the constitution for an amount up to and including their life.

It’s not about political foreign policies, fighting foreign wars or even being the world's protection force. It’s about something much bigger than that. The purpose of the US military is to protect the constitution, and freedom loving people from tyrants.


It’s a legacy we should preserve and history we should we remember.


Hi, I'm Chris Kunkel, Marine, combat veteran...

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